WHO WE ARE

Justice education project

The Justice Education Project is the very first national youth-led and youth-focused criminal justice nonprofit in the United States. Our mission is to empower Generation Z to advocate against the unjust policies and inequities in the US criminal justice system. We provide resources, activism tools, and opportunities to directly help current and formerly incarcerated people (especially women and children).  

We aim to break down societal apathy surrounding the incarcerated population by bringing youth proximate to incarcerated people.

Fiscally sponsored by the Power Shift Network.

OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Change Starts with (You)th

Hosted a book promotional event at Jersey City City Hall

Chapters

Establishing over 19+ local chapters in the country

Menstrual Hygiene Products

Partnered with HerDrive to donate over 15,000+ menstrual hygiene products to incarcerated women in 11+ states

Coalition

Joined Global Youth Action Coalition: Coalition of other youth organizations for social advocacy

Webinars

15+ webinars: including with Senator Jason Pizzo, Manhattan Supreme Court, ACLU, Innocence Project, and more!

Instagram + TikTok

Researched over 100 topics with over 300K+ impressions (1.4K followers on Instagram, 7000+ followers on Tiktok)

Fundraising

$1.5K raised for KIND, to support deported and detained immigrant children

Toolkits

Created many toolkits about topics ranging from the Clean Slate Campaign to Transformative Justice

OUR STORY

     Across the United States, millions of youth are demanding change, condemning the long-existing systemic inequalities faced by marginalized communities and mobilizing support to further educate themselves and others. The power of youth activism has been evident in all movements, from the 1960s Civil Rights movement to the 21st century Black Lives Matter movement.


     Thus, it is crucial for us to become the trailblazers of the criminal justice reform movement, harnessing this power.


      In February of 2019, a MyVoice poll concluded that 56% of youth ages 14-24 knew little to nothing about the justice system. Socially active students still find difficulty in learning about the prison industrial complex and abolitionist stances due to complex legal jargon. This stems from the fact that there are many criminal justice books targeted towards those involved in academia, but very few aimed towards introductory activists who need a foundational understanding to jumpstart their work in this field. 
 

    Given that our generation will hold future positions of power, it is imperative that they are empowered with the education that is needed to create significant change. We hope to engage this generation with a passion for criminal justice reform by empowering them with the information and sharing lived experiences of incarcerated people. 

unnamed.png